Our Climate assembles climate mosaic to push price on pollution

Our Climate assembles climate mosaic to push price on pollution

On June 22nd, before the dome of the Massachusetts State House, a group of youth activists with Our Climate, a youth-led carbon pricing advocacy organization in the United States, assembled their largest climate mosaic yet. Nicholas O’Toole, a student at New York University and summer fellow with Our Climate, provides insights into the outcomes of the event and his vision for carbon pricing in Massachusetts in this CPLC blog.

The Future of U.S. Carbon-Pricing Policy

The Future of U.S. Carbon-Pricing Policy

Dr. Robert Stavins provides a brief summary of his new paper “The Future of U.S. Carbon-Pricing Policy”. The full paper can be downloaded here. In his paper and in this blog, Dr. Stavins explores two questions: (1) how do the two major approaches to carbon pricing (carbon taxes and cap and trade) compare on relevant dimensions, including but not limited to efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and distributional equity?  (2) Which approach is more likely to be adopted in the future in the United States?

Carbon pricing should drive African development, not hinder it

Carbon pricing should drive African development, not hinder it

This week, representatives from government, business and civil society are gathering at the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition’s High-Level Assembly to discuss how carbon pricing can be used to shift investments towards low-carbon and climate-resilient projects, and how carbon pricing can address broader social concerns.

Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy Joins the CPLC

Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy Joins the CPLC

As carbon pricing gains increasing attention around the world, it’s essential that policies are informed by independent and sound analysis. The Carbon Tax Research Initiative at Columbia University's Center on Global Energy Policy is pleased to join the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition to offer its analytical expertise and learn from CPLC members about the opportunities and challenges of carbon pricing. CGEP’s initiative helps policymakers, businesses, and other leaders understand carbon pricing and the impacts on the economy, emissions and energy markets.

Gearing Up for Change: Challenges faced by Indian Private Sector as they take on Carbon Pricing

Gearing Up for Change: Challenges faced by Indian Private Sector as they take on Carbon Pricing

Over the past few years, there has been a groundswell of support for carbon pricing - not only by governments, but increasingly by the private sector. As of 2017, almost 1400 companies worldwide are embedding an internal carbon price into their business strategies, up from 140 in 2014.

Building on this theme, Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition (CPLC) and its partners, World Resources Institute (WRI), CDP, and International Finance Corporation (IFC) joined forces with The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) to convene a private sector roundtable in the margins of the first International Research Conference on Carbon Pricing on February 14-15, 2019 in New Delhi, India.

Learn more about the key takeaways from the discussion.

Four provinces outperformed the rest, all while pricing carbon pollution

Four provinces outperformed the rest, all while pricing carbon pollution

Opponents of carbon pollution pricing have had a busy year, incessantly warning of the severe economic damage such policies will purportedly cause.

Thankfully, proponents of clean growth have had a busy year too. Alberta wrapped up its consultation process on output-based allocations for large industrial emitters, Manitoba and Nova Scotia announced new carbon pricing systems, and the federal government took steps to implement a pan-Canadian backstop for carbon pricing.

Read the full op-ed from CPLC Partner Pembina Institute’s Maximilian Kniewasser and Julia-Maria Becker.

Learn How to Manage GHG Emissions

Learn How to Manage GHG Emissions

The George Washington University, as a member of the CPLC, offers a unique graduate-level program in GHG Management. And it’s available online so you can earn your Certificate in GHG Management regardless of your location. In four online semester-length courses world experts offer comprehensive hands-on training that prepares you to begin your GHG management career immediately. And you can complete the program in less than one year.

A Carbon Price Can Benefit the Poor While Reducing Emissions

A Carbon Price Can Benefit the Poor While Reducing Emissions

Climate discussions like those we’ve just been seeing at the UN summit in Katowice, Poland tend to focus on working together to deliver existing climate commitments and raising ambition—getting countries to reduce more GHG emissions, faster.  But there’s an equally important issue that gets far less attention: ensuring climate action is delivered in a way that doesn’t leave anyone behind, particularly the world’s most vulnerable people.

See Helen Mountford and Molly McGregors’ latest blog post on how carbon pricing can benefit the poor and reduce emissions.

How can carbon pricing support economic diversification in the Arab Gulf States?

How can carbon pricing support economic diversification in the Arab Gulf States?

The Arab Gulf States – Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the UAE –are highly vulnerable to oil price shocks due to their high economic reliance on oil and gas export revenues. Historically, oil price shocks have been a source of pressure on the Arab Gulf States economies. However, only since mid-2014 have oil prices seemed to pressure on political regimes to consider domestic economic reforms and development of alternative sources of income (i.e. economic diversification).

To avoid long-term negative implications – such as increasing total CO2 emissions and deterioration of air quality associated with increasing downstream petrochemical energy intensive industries, fossil fuel subsidy reforms, enhancing energy efficiency and the use of clean energy technologies are indeed instrumental to tackle such issues. In this article, carbon pricing is proposed as a useful instrument to complement the aforementioned tools.

Why your smartphone and acid rain should give you hope about climate change

Why your smartphone and acid rain should give you hope about climate change

Earlier this Fall, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) put the world on notice (again): Unless we make significant changes in how we get our energy and use our land, we will be committing to a future with tremendous human suffering from extreme weather, drought, and ecological damage. While the report is driving important conversations about solutions to this challenge, the average reader might feel discouraged about the changes required. Luckily, the truth is more hopeful than some recent press lets on.

See the latest from Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Smith College, Alex Barron.