Global Climate Action Summit Leader Anand Mahindra Issues New Climate Challenge to Corporations

Global Climate Action Summit Leader Anand Mahindra Issues  New Climate Challenge to Corporations

ECONOMISTS have long argued that the most efficient way to curb global warming is to put a price on the greenhouse-gas emissions that cause it. A total of 41 OECD and G20 governments have announced either a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade scheme, or both. Add state and local schemes, and they cover 15% of the world’s emissions, up from 4% in 2010. Voters concerned about climate change are egging them on. So, too, are corporate bosses. More firms are imposing such pricing on themselves, even in places where policymakers are dragging their feet.

Companies are moving faster than many governments on carbon pricing

Companies are moving faster than many governments on carbon pricing

ECONOMISTS have long argued that the most efficient way to curb global warming is to put a price on the greenhouse-gas emissions that cause it. A total of 41 OECD and G20 governments have announced either a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade scheme, or both. Add state and local schemes, and they cover 15% of the world’s emissions, up from 4% in 2010. Voters concerned about climate change are egging them on. So, too, are corporate bosses. More firms are imposing such pricing on themselves, even in places where policymakers are dragging their feet.

Leaders Commit to Regional Cooperation on Carbon Pricing in the Americas

Leaders Commit to Regional Cooperation on Carbon Pricing in the Americas

on the occasion of the One Planet Summit, government leaders of Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, México, the Governors of California and Washington, and the Premiers of Alberta, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec launched the Carbon Pricing in the Americas cooperative framework.  

Environment and climate Ministers from France, Germany, United-Kingdom, Sweden and the Netherlands commit to implement or evaluate the introduction of a meaningful carbon price

Press Release

Environment and climate Ministers from France, Germany, United-Kingdom, Sweden and the Netherlands consider that the carbon price is an effective tool to drive deep decarbonisation of the world economy when integrated in a coherent policies and measures package.


They underlined today, at the One Planet Summit in Paris, that carbon pricing should be predictable and may grow over time to meet the objective of the Paris Agreement to maintain global warming well below 2 degrees.


They welcomed the Report of the High-Level Commission on Carbon Prices presented by Joseph Stiglitz and Lord Nicholas Stern that identified corridors of carbon prices that can be used to guide the design of carbon pricing instruments and other climate policies, regulations, and measures to incentivise climate action.


They also welcomed the recent agreement to reform the EU-ETS. Although there is no specific target price, they expect this reform to result in a more meaningful carbon price in the coming years, which depends on many variables.

However, they underlined that additional reforms may be needed to provide direction to investors and businesses for the development of business models that are in line with keeping the global temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius.


They therefore committed to implement or evaluate, the introduction of a meaningful carbon price in relevant sectors.

Banks Explore Challenges Decarbonization Poses to Ship Finance

Banks Explore Challenges Decarbonization Poses to Ship Finance

London, November 8, 2017—At a Global Maritime Forum roundtable in London yesterday, the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition and global NGO Carbon War Room, worked with shipping leads from major global financial institutions to explore the challenges of decarbonization for ship financing.

With the launch of the report Preparing shipping banks for climate change: How can internal carbon pricing help ship-financing banks in risk management?,  the two organisations called for shipping’s financial institutions to begin analysing and managing the risks created by the shipping industry’s imminent decarbonisation. 

Lessons from first campus carbon-pricing scheme

Lessons from first campus carbon-pricing scheme

Putting a value on emissions can lower energy use, write Kenneth Gillingham, Stefano Carattini and Daniel Esty. In July, Yale became the first university to launch a carbon-price programme across its campus. More than 250 buildings, together accounting for nearly 70% of the institution's emissions, will be charged US$40 per tonne of carbon dioxide that they emit as a result of energy use. Buildings that reduce their emissions more than the average will receive a share of the funds collected.

More Countries Are Putting a Price on Carbon But Stronger Action Is Needed to Meet Paris Targets: New World Bank Report

More Countries Are Putting a Price on Carbon But Stronger Action Is Needed to Meet Paris Targets: New World Bank Report

Washington, DC, November 1, 2017 — More and more countries and sub-national jurisdictions are putting a price on carbon but the level of action must ramp up significantly to help the world meet its Paris Agreement targets, says a new World Bank report.

Launched just ahead of the UNFCCC’s Climate COP23 in Bonn, the annual review: State and Trends of Carbon Pricing 2017, presents good and not-so-good news.

Enabling Collaborative Action on Carbon Pricing in Africa

Enabling Collaborative Action on Carbon Pricing in Africa

A consultative dialogue was organized by the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition (CPLC) in collaboration with the African Development Bank, the UNFCCC and the German Ministry of Environment on Oct 5-6, 2017, to discuss the role and potential for carbon pricing instruments in African economies. It gathered about 25 public and private sector experts from various African countries, including Benin, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, Senegal, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

More than eight-fold leap over four years in global companies pricing carbon into business plans

More than eight-fold leap over four years in global companies pricing carbon into business plans

Putting a price on carbon is becoming the new normal for major multinationals with almost 1,400 companies1 factoring an internal carbon price into business plans. This represents an eight-fold leap in take up in the last four years, compared to just 150 companies in 2014, and includes more than 100 Fortune Global 500 companies with collective annual revenues of US$7 trillion